Mariah... but not like Mariah Carey

things I find funny. or sweet. or weird. or downright scary
Recent Tweets @

ensoulx:

the premise of The Giver is literally based on Jonas seeing color when no one else can

why is the movie in color

YES THAT IS MY QUESTION TOO

(via twofish)

Mo’s first road trip! #catinthebag

Mariah… but not like Mariah Carey turned 6 today!

Crazy.

Someone once told me that human beings have three dimensions: how you see yourself, how others see you, and how you want others to see you. The closer the distance between the three dimensions, the more at peace you are and the more stable you become.
Marwa Rakha (The Poison Tree)

(via weaponsofwords)

I came in like a wrecking ball.
Sylvia Plath (via incorrectsylviaplathquotes)

(via bees-knees)

katespencer:

itsshowtime:

 

The Twilight one is so perfect and also a poem. 

josephinabiden:

Best TV couple ever.

(via kelsium)

theatlantic:

English Has a New Preposition, Because Internet

Let’s start with the dull stuff, because pragmatism.

The word “because,” in standard English usage, is a subordinating conjunction, which means that it connects two parts of a sentence in which one (the subordinate) explains the other. In that capacity, “because” has two distinct forms. It can be followed either by a finite clause (I’m reading this because [I saw it on the web]) or by a prepositional phrase (I’m reading this because [of the web]). These two forms are, traditionally, the only ones to which “because” lends itself.

I mention all that … because language. Because evolution. Because there is another way to use “because.” Linguists are calling it the “prepositional-because.” Or the “because-noun.

You probably know it better, however, as explanation by way of Internet—explanation that maximizes efficiency and irony in equal measure. I’m late because YouTube. You’re reading this because procrastination. As the linguist Stan Carey delightfully sums it up: “‘Because’ has become a preposition, because grammar.”

Read more. [Image: Skreened.com]

Femininity is depicted as weakness, the sapping of strength, yet masculinity is so fragile that apparently even the slightest brush with the feminine destroys it.

Gwen Sharp

image

(via pushtheheart)

feelin this

(via femmesandfamily)

(via outforhealth)

And we’re going to outer space… @ Cut Copy (at Majestic Theatre)

Some periods of our growth are so confusing that we don’t even recognize that growth is happening. We may feel hostile or angry or weepy and hysterical, or we may feel depressed. It would never occur to us, unless we stumbled on a book or a person who explained to us, that we were in fact in the process of change, of actually becoming larger, spiritually, than we were before. Whenever we grow, we tend to feel it, as a young seed must feel the weight and inertia of the earth as it seeks to break out of its shell on its way to becoming a plant. Often the feeling is anything but pleasant. But what is most unpleasant is the not knowing what is happening. Those long periods when something inside ourselves seems to be waiting, holding its breath, unsure about what the next step should be, eventually become the periods we wait for, for it is in those periods that we realize that we are being prepared for the next phase of our life and that, in all probability, a new level of the personality is about to be revealed.

Alice Walker, Living by the Word (via socialismandrum)

(via monkeyfrog)

(via capucha)

You have to pick the places you don’t walk away from.
Joan Didion (via kdecember)

(via beenthinking)